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Introduction

Welcome to the website of Poetry Dyslexia and Imagination. Our aim is to be a creative platform for people who have dyslexia and other forms of neuro diversity.
When it comes to the written word all too often dyslexia is associated with what people can’t do, but there are many famous dyslexic poets and authors not to mention many other creative dyslexic people. If you are one of those people we would like to hear from you..

Site Logo

Our Story In 2018 we started a project which asked people to write short poems about their experiences of dyslexia.
We then asked artists to respond to those poems.
The result: an amazing exhibition of art videos, music and words.

After one week in Crewe we took our exhibition on the road to: Manchester, Congleton, Leicester and Telford, covering local libraries, specialist events and poetry events. We also organise poetry readings and would be happy to talk about our project to relevant groups.
We can put you in touch with highly trained dyslexia friendly poets and artists based in the North-West of England to run workshops.

News


On the 25th June 2022, we were delighted to attend an action packed conference run by the ADHD Foundation, called Neurodiversity a new paradigm. Their umbrella project is running nationwide, in Liverpool you can find the display next to Primark.
You can find more information on their website: http://www.adhdfoundation.org.uk. or on twitter: @adhdfoundation.

One of our featured poets Greth Williams is seen here presenting his framed poem to the organisers.

Gareth at Umberella Project


The Winner of the City of Liverpool Poetry Competition 2021

Over the lockdown we have been proud to support a poetry competition run by Liverpool City College inviting neuro-divergent students to share their experience of being dyslexic. We are delighted to have a winner who will receive a book token and some DPI goodies. We look forward to doing more events with Liverpool City College.

Daisy Deevey Poem

My World

Daisy Deevey - Studying Level 3 Photography

My name is Daisy, and I would like to say how autism affects me every day.
I always feel that I need to hide just so I can cry inside.
I like to use tactical toys to keep my brain at rest, as most people see me laugh but really, I am stressed.
Noises get too much sometimes, and I want to run away.
People appearing left and right just really ruin my day.
Making friends is hard as I lack the social cues.
There is a lot trapped inside me and it will not come out on cue so please just be patient because I really need you too.
I may cover my ears as sound overwhelms me, so I hide away with my support cat Dotty.
I hate being touched and I hate being scared but I don't mind me I'm in my own little world.

Reviews

A fantastic and insightful exhibition. Congratulations
Amazing and varied work-it gave me lots of ideas

Poems

Patrick Druggan: Fillan Pool

Patrick Druggan

Patrick Druggan
Patrick Druggan grew up in Glasgow and went to university there. He is a scientist and has worked on diagnostic tests for cancers and infections on and off for the past 35 years. He is dyslexic. He learned to write poetry when no-one was looking.

There is holiness in water as it falls
undestroyed by love or the ache of time.
Lailoken, as naked as sunshine,
lost half himself at bloody Arferydd
then wandered the Forest of Celyddon
became Myrddin Wyllt in his lone madness
hid from the other world beneath Sidh Chaillean
watched tongues of fire dance on the heads of deer
heard the wind in the song of the soaring lark.

Sat on the crag by the Molendinar Burn
in the ancient parish of Saint Kentigern
that runs under the road where I would wait
for the bus home, standing in constant rain
a dream of her wrapped up in lab notes,
the deathly smell of Lysol on them

I want to spend the night on Cader Idris,
in that cold, become mad man or poet
like before the ships of the Gaels
like before the Sassunoch came,
like before yr Hen Ogledd failed
confined by these Saxon words
to the green mountains of Wales.

She always appears in dreams dressed in white,
as young as on the morning we last met,
no sound, silent as the words on a page
pale as memory, paler than regret.


Finola Scott: words gang up

Rob H

Finola Scott A Makar of the Federation of Writers, Finola Scott writes in both Scots and English. She was mentored on the Clydebuilt scheme by Liz Lochead. Her work is anthologised and published widely including in New Writing Scotland, Lighthouse and One Hand Clapping. Finola has won many competitions, recently the Hugh MacDiarmid Tassie. She also was runner-up in the McLellan competition (Scots). A slam-winning Granny she performed at the Edinburgh, Wigtown and Gatehouse of Fleet Book Festivals as well as headlining many UK events. Politics, environment and relationships concern her. Although she knows poetry won’t change the world, she continues to write. Discover information about her poems and events on the Facebook Group.

drunken spider-writing hid a lot
but the saying it
out loud
oh the saying
a boyfriend would smile
pat my knee then
correct me smiling
it's linn oo lee um
tiddleyhum
I learned to say lino


school was tricky
parllelogram / / paralellogram
with its pal corrr /oll /or/ ry
redlorryyellowlorryred
I felt my tongue helter-skelter
those lls
for leather
pell mell

time taught me snakey sneaky
avoidances mouth-dances
those terradactyls & thesauruses
til I was saved
well almost
by spell checker
by tippytappy txt msgs


Ian Henery: I’m Sorry I Forgot (for National I Forgot Day)

Ian H

Ian Henery is a prolific poet, playwright and activist in the midlands.
A former Walsall poet laureate, he also writes commissions, runs workshops and has hosted a radio programme. His collection Poems of Hope was published in 2023 and he is poet in residence for WCR fm. He has also been consistent in his support for positive social change; his heart is with the industrial working class from which he descends.
For more about him check out his website

Batman can't go out, ladders in his tights,
Gotham lies helpless in the deepest night.
Celebrity gone for superheroes,
Franchise disappeared, they're earning zero.
Wolverine's out to lunch, phone off the hook,
Midlife crisis, manicure he has booked
And they are sorry, the X Men
Wondering if they'll work again –
And I`m sorry, really sorry,
Writing sorry with this old pen.

I never said John Lennon couldn't sing
But the Silver Beatles were not my thing.
I took a dislike to that Mick Jagger,
I always thought he had too much swagger.
Styled myself on Arthur Lowe, Dad`s Army,
Refused to sign the Sex Pistols, just barmy;
Now hear Arthur say "stupid boy",
Arthur Lowe`s right – where is the joy?
And I'm sorry, really sorry
Must confess – no point in being coy.

The mariner who lost his way at sea,
The chef who's forgotten his recipes;
That sad old captain of the Titanic
Who hit an iceberg which was gigantic;
How about Jack who sold the cow for beans?
Cheated of a magic beanstalk, so mean?
Jack's family now out on a limb,
And his brothers are looking Grimm
And I'm sorry, really sorry
My chances of reprieve are slim.

Take a good look at the state of the world:
Where are banners of peace and love unfurled?
Have we forgotten that we are all one?
One people, one planet under one sun?
If we forget this we will be sorry,
Crushed beneath wheels of history`s lorry;
It`s bigger than the Berlin Wall,
Almost Biblical like The Fall
And I`m so sorry I forgot Truth – I'm the sorriest of all.


Emma Lea

Emma Lea

Emma Lea
Emma is a dyslexic poet, author and SEN specialist living in Stretford with her partner, daughter and rescue hens. She has started to record her writings as videos with the text on the screen to make her books more accessible to people who can't access them as traditional paperbacks for whatever reason. These read along audiobooks are available for free to anyone who wants them and has an internet connection. Emma has an MA in Inclusive Education and SEN. She works with home schooling families who's children cannot access either mainstream or specialist provision in schools and is incredibly proud of the progress 'her chiddlers' make. The chickens are a real conundrum. Emma doesn't like eggs.

Sometimes I feel like a jungle jellyfish
In a world that's just not made for me
Where I don't fit in and I can't seem to breathe,
In a world where I want to just be.
...


Peter Street: NOT BEING ME

Peter Street

Peter Street
I left school in 1964, barely able to read and write and I ended up grave digging and gardening. But In 1984, after a spinal accident, I studied O’levels at college. It was all going wrong, I failed the course twice! But there was a tutor and poet, John Cassidy, who introduced me to poetry while telling me there weren’t as many rules as when writing prose. Some poets even miss out all the rules.
That was when my life as a poet began.
Other poets introduced me to the poetry of E.E. Cummings who didn’t use punctuation.
My first book was published in 1993 after other poets incited I write about my shortcomings in education. Again another beginning, and that has been the same with four more collections. My honesty got me into the BBC as a writer in residence & teaching poetry and worked for many years in prisons with young offenders, teaching them the joy of writing and self-expression. I have been a recipient of a Royal Literary Fund recipient.

Childhood nights were dreams
of being a sheep
then up and outside of a morning
a quick check to see

if by any chance in the night
there had been a change
of being just like all my friends
and not the odd one out

like afternoon dance lessons
spent hidden
in the toilet
out the way because

I couldn’t dance the sheep steps
that’s why I dreamed
of being a sheep
so I could be like everyone else


Nick Degg: Weetabix

Nick Degg

Nick Degg is a Potteries Poet who crafts words with the dexterity of a sausage knotter, indeed it has been said that some of his poems actually taste of pork. He is a multi Slam winning poet who has done work for the BBC, Theatres, Football clubs, Libraries, Schools and a whole host of Musicians. He likes to push the boundaries of spoken word to make it accessible to those who wouldn't normally entertain poetry.

Weetabix

I used to make up stories
Before my Daughter went to sleep,
"Tell me about the bike with a wobbly wheel Dad"
"Tell me about the cat that eats vans Dad"
She'd say
And I'd make up a story,
to which she'd absorb every word
Like Weetabix drinks milk

I used to sit with my Son
Before he went to sleep,
Him with his "Shoot" magazine
And I'd ask him
"What's Southamptons goal difference bud"?
Or "Where do you think Everton is bud"?
And we'd discuss it,
Then I'd tuck him in
"Can I leave my glasses on
so I can see my dreams better"
He'd say
At breakfast we'd watch the Weetabix
Soaking up the milk
Like stories
and numbers
and places


Nick Degg: Weetabix

Nick Degg

Nick Degg is a Potteries Poet who crafts words with the dexterity of a sausage knotter, indeed it has been said that some of his poems actually taste of pork. He is a multi Slam winning poet who has done work for the BBC, Theatres, Football clubs, Libraries, Schools and a whole host of Musicians. He likes to push the boundaries of spoken word to make it accessible to those who wouldn't normally entertain poetry.

I used to make up stories Before my Daughter went to sleep,
"Tell me about the bike with a wobbly wheel Dad"
"Tell me about the cat that eats vans Dad" She'd say
And I'd make up a story, to which she'd absorb every word
Like Weetabix drinks milk I used to sit with my Son
Before he went to sleep,
Him with his "Shoot" magazine
And I'd ask him "What's Southamptons goal difference bud"?
Or "Where do you think Everton is bud"?
And we'd discuss it,
Then I'd tuck him in
"Can I leave my glasses on so I can see my dreams better"
He'd say At breakfast we'd watch the Weetabix
Soaking up the milk
Like stories and numbers and places


Maureen Weldon

Maureen Weldon

Maureen Weldon is Irish and lives in North Wales. She is a former professional ballet dancer and now a widely published poet. In 2014 she represented Wales at Ukraine’s Terra Poetica. She has published eight books of poetry, her latest The Waking Hour" Published by Red Squirrel Press, winning 'Book of the Month’ at The Poetry Kit.

The Dancer

I am tired
my brain hangs loose
locked in my rucksack.
This is the hour for the owl to fly
to hoot to winking moon
through clouds of mist.
This is night,
the quiet time ..
Because I am on my own
while night-clubs choke
with laughter
and the girl in white throws her shoe
at the man who wanted to fill it
with beer, but could not,
no matter how hard he tried.
Then the many houses,
blinking with lovemaking.
And babies and grannies
and granddads.
But I like being on my own
in this quiet time,
because tomorrow
I will wrap my ankles
round the world.

Published by Poetry Scotland
Featured and published by The Poetry Kit & Caught In The Net
Editor: Jim Bennett.


Brendan Hawthorne

Brendan Hawthorne

Brendan Hawthorne is a poet, playwright, writer and musician, based in the West Midlands.
First published in 2004 by bluechromehe was described as being the ‘best Urban Poet of his time.’ He has since released four poetry collections and two plays via various publishers and has written seven titles of local interest for Bradwell Books. He has appeared on the One Show and a featured inseton Flog It! an interviewee for Adrian Chiles in a BBC documentary and West Midlands Ambassador for Smooth Radio for a two-year period. A viral hit in 2017 on BBC Radio WM, Brendan has gained over a million views to date for his poetry. He has been awarded the Bill o’Bowes Cup for best written dialect two years running (2018/19 and 2019/20) and performed from Anthony Gormley's 4th Plinth. Brendan was made Poet Laureate of Wednesbury in 2014, he is one of the Black Country 100 Masters and has worked on numerous commissions, including NHS, English Heritage and National Trust. Brendan’s latest poetry collection Seventies Child and Other Fashion Trends is published by Dream Well Writing and is available via the Dream Well Writing website. For further details please contact via the website: www.brendanhawthorne.org
My experience with dyslexia has led me to believe that it’s just another way of looking at things. Embrace the view!

The Order of Words

I was born with the devil’s hand
Held in Christian righteousness
and educated in the progressive sixties
where right-handed scissors
cut jagged lines
and my writing spelt sdrawkcab
backwards across the feint ruled pages
searching for the secure margins
of left handedness
A caggy
A leftie
That was me
They told my mom I’d be disadvantaged
They told my mom they hit me with rulers
to break the creative spirit
get my measure and
take me out of my right mind
Readied to conform to the British standards
of an intolerant and blinkered society
My creative side was red taped down
by bureaucratic fools
My written communication suffered
My art suffered
I became mirrored in vision
Barricaded
Closed down
Shuttered up
My good bad hand tied behind me
left only to throw salt
to blind the demon’s eye
whilst experts comforted me
with earnest patronising precision
telling me I’d be better off
when I was right
And the frustration grew
And the barriers built
And intelligence could not find
a way through the tangled webs
of institutionalised confusion
Letters formed but sentences
couldn't flow at the rate
of an untamed mind
where imagination knew no bounds
I remained shackled
because they said so
I fluffed exams
because I didn’t comprehend
I mixed sentences like the lifetime one
those educationalists gave me
I drifted to find escape routes
Tried to dig my way out
b’s were d’s and algebra
was purely x-rated
So they taught me French instead
as if my problems weren’t acutely accented enough


Karen Downs-Barton

Karen Downs-Barton

Karen Downs-Barton is a neurodiverse poet from the Romani community and winner of the Cosmo Davenport-Hines poetry competition 2021. She is a Creative Writing Doctoral candidate and poetry tutor at King's College, London. Her thesis explores the formation of identity through experimental and multilingual poetics set against outdated historical textual tropes. Her poetry highlights the experiences of a Roma children growing up in the state childcare system, minority communities, outsider languages and has been translated into Russian, Spanish and Farsi. Her work is widely anthologised and can be viewed in Wagtail: The Romani Women's Anthology; Rattle; Ink, Sweat and Tears; Tears in the Fence; Night Picnic Journal; The High Window; Alyss; The Otolith; The Fem Review; The Goose; The Curly Mind; Persian Sugar in English Tea; amongst others.
Learn More

Dyslexia Runs in Families

Light slants into the scullery kitchen
where I am looking at pictures in comics.

Tripe is bubbling in a battered saucepan
while in a Pyrex jar an onion cools in white liquor.

Bapo has rocked back on his one good chair,
balanced between floating and falling.

His newspaper is a curtain concealing his face:
he might be sleeping or pretending, like I am.

I look at the smudging lines of print,
his earthy fingers supporting the pages.

Upside-down people are frontpage news;
lives his hold has made a turmoil

Bapo: Grandfather, colloquial Romani


Gareth Williams

Gareth W

I approach poetry as a beginner and enjoy the thrill and fun of playing with words to create poems which really speak to people.
The poetry I write covers all aspects of life, through my eyes; a (nearly) 40 year old man, with two boys and a wife, growing up in and owning a business in Crewe, Cheshire until we moved to Conwy in 2020.
Find out more: https://www.lifepoemsaboutyou.co.uk/


Mark Pajak

Mark P

Mark Pajak has written for The BBC and The Guardian, among others.
He has been three times commended in the National Poetry Competition, awarded first place in The Bridport Prize and has also received a Northern Writers’ Award and an Eric Gregory Award. His first collection is forthcoming in 2022.

Cat on the Tracks

He wore the night in his fur, sat on a rung
between the rails, tail wisping like smoke

as a distant train split the air along its seam.
Its coming headlight laid down track

and placed an opal into each black seed
of the cat’s eyes, every blink slow as an eclipse.

Soon the white light pinned him, the only drop
of night left as vibration turned the rails to mercury.

But there was no give in the cat, no flex anywhere
but his tail. And for a moment their roles reversed,

as though it were the train facing the inevitable cat,
the end of the line. The world lit up like a page

and the train a sentence before the full-stop.


Rob H

Rob H

The Kid going Now Here

A fourteen year old sat in geography
Pass the books around, read a section each
Go round the room, for us all to hear
I’m sitting here, not listening, I'm trying to work it out
So I can be practising the one I'll stumble through.
Help me best mate, what’s this jumble here
Don’t worry I'll whisper words to help you out
To reduce your embarrassment, and turning red.
My dreaded turn comes, I splutter out garbled sounds
My next door neighbour's mice voices save a few
And my section's done, or so I think.
Well carry on boy, the big man orders,
And you move here, my friendly helper disappears.
He made me read four whole pages
Tutting at my bumbling mistakes, it seemed forever
Berating easy words I got wrong, I voiced, "now-here"
He laughed out loud, "now-here? It's pronounced no-where"
Which is where you'll get in life, reading like you're five.
Bastard, I hated him for that, but I had the last laugh
I got a B in Geography, and although it took some time
I even passed my English third time round.


Andy N

Andy N

Andy N is the author of 6 full length poetry collections, the most recent being 'Haiku of life' and co-runs Chorlton's always welcoming Spoken Word Open Mic 'Speak Easy'.
He does ambient music under the name of Ocean in a Bottle and has a regular column on the Sunday Tribune.
He runs/co-runs Podcast series such as Spoken Label, Reading in Bed, Comics Unity, Koll, Andy and Amanda and Wrestle Up.

Single Ticket to Dyspraxia

You broke down during your answer
after a lifetime of not realising what it was
stating ‘if there’s something to fall over
or something to break
or something to burn myself on
or cut myself on I will do it’

I was 28
barely into my first year
at University
and was wondering
how was I going to cope
when things got more difficult.
...


Mel Woodend

Mel Woodend Performing

Mel Wardle Woodend is Staffordshire Poet Laureate 2019-2022.
Mel holds an MA Creative Writing, is one half of WORD Stafford, enjoys facilitating poetry workshops, and participating in spoken word. She is founder of dyslexia friendly publishing company Dream Well Writing Ltd, reflecting her passion for making reading and books accessible to all.

Street Corner Kid

He’s a street corner kid leaving school with nothing to show for the blazer the uniform,
Nothing to show apart from a report that says he ‘wouldn’t conform.’
He congregates on street corners with mates in labels they can’t really afford;
Unwashed, unkempt, and unemployed.
Standing together, they dress the same: An understated statement
Firming friendships as solid as cement.
Looking for fun found in their new freedom
Away from the mindless misery and mortification.
...


Nanny K

Nanny K
I am dyslexic I prefer to read and write in rhyme, it helps me all the time. As I am working with the rhythmic part of my brain. Rhythm has enabled me to create poetry & songs for the first time in my life. It has allowed me to express myself in a way I never believe I could before. I am Dyslexic and I still get total stuck on words that predictive text hasn’t got a clue about! Because you don’t even have the first letter right. I only learnt to spell basic words when I was teaching my own children to read. I’m 49 and still struggle every day! Reading & Writing took me a long time to learn but I got there in the end with the help of rhythm and rhyme.

I am Dyslexic

🥰I am dyslexic my name is Nanny💕K🤗
⭐️From seesingsay 👀🎶🤗⭐️
🤗I read & write in rhyme🎶
🤗It helps me all the time🕰
🤗I sing lots of songs🎶
🤗All day long⏳
🤗As I’m working with a 👥
...


Sam Rapp

Sam Rapp (The Dyslexic Poet)
Sam Rapp has won awards for her writing. She is a poet, playwright, speaker, editor and part time lawyer.
She is Chair of Dyslexia House Association, Co-Chair of the Disability staff network, Ambassador for Medway Disability Action and Co-Chair Creative Medway.
She runs Fun with Words Productions, conducting creative writing workshops, as a creative writing teacher. She is published in various books, magazines, radio TV, and took her one woman show (The Amazing Dyslexic Poetry Show) to the Edinburgh Fringe festival 2019. She is a regular on BBC radio Kent, and has had one of her plays about WWI performed in the UK and on TV in Gibraltar.

We are the Amazing Dyslexics

We are the Amazing Dyslexics
We are funny, we are witty we have no apology or pity
We focus at a slower speed
We are not greedy
It takes us time to read

We are the Amazing Dyslexics

We can achieve greatness,
Walking on the moon, and kissing the sun
We are unique when we speak, write spell,
Whatever we decide to do,

We can make wine with Bacchus and look into the eyes of Zeus,
As the thunder, makes the sky shake loose,

Words or numbers can seem wobbly to some,
But look at Einstein, Whoopi Goldberg,
Agatha Christie, Will I am
Joss stone
De-Vinci
Written into history

Yeah, We are the Amazing Dyslexics
How do you know, said the boy in the back of the row
I’m the Dyslexic Poet, I guess I know so,
Just go out and be amazing, be yourself
That’s all you have to know
Us dyslexics
Are just simply Amazing.

© Sam Rapp

Sam’s book, "Rant, Dyslexic me", is a collection of some of her poems about being dyslexic.
Her second collection is coming out this year.



Dyslexia Poetry Exhibition

Greg

Gregory Kearns is a writer based in Liverpool.
He has been published in Bath Magg, Introduction X: The Poetry Business Book of New Poets amongst numerous other publications. Other than poetry, Gregory has written text for music with No Dice Collective and written text for physical theatre as part of the Tmesis Graduate Company. He currently works as an Events and Community Fundraiser at The Brain Charity, who help people affected by neurological conditions including dyslexia.

Greg’s rich and moving poem Ghhoti inspired this papier mache sculpture by artist Carole Jones.

Ghoti

I’m asked to read out names on awards night
at school. I’m reassured that I’ll be helped

to pronounce all the names that I can’t read.
The teacher points to my piece of paper

scaled from my nervous folding. This one’s
easy, say it as its spelt – So I do

and I’m wrong – over and over. So
I practice – even double check the hard names.

It’s said like café and that helps until
my memory aid swims away,

and there, the slight smile of disappointment
on students’ faces as I get them wrong.

To think that I can spell fish: ghoti and pheti
the way I always read unite as untie.

Contribute Your Poem

If you have written a poem about any aspect of dyslexia, then please contribute to our project.
Please send us no more than three poems.
Please include a short biography with no more than 50 words including your connection with dyslexia.
Each month we will feature a new poem and poet about dyslexia.

Featured Poets

Helen Kay

Profile: Helen

Helen’s poems crop up in various magazines and she has been placed in a range of competitions. She has an MA in poetry from MMU where she won the Rosamond Prize for poetry/music collaboration in 2018.
Her debut pamphlet, The Poultry Lover’s Guide to Poetry, was published by Indigo Dreams in 2015. Her latest pamphlet about dyslexia is called This Lexia and Other Languages and will be published by v. press in 2020. Some of her poems about dyslexia have been made into poetry films and were shown at the Athens Poetry Film Festival in 2018. Helen is a specialist dyslexia tutor and is from a dyslexic household


Kat Williams

Profile: Kat Williams

I’m Kat Williams (she/her) and I’m an illustrator.
I especially enjoy drawing people, animals, and nature. I’ve recently finished working on my first children’s book, a non-fiction book about activists throughout history who have experienced disabilities or long-term illness, which is due to be published by Scholastic in March 2021.
I also run a small business selling handmade crafts such as greetings cards, jewellery, lampshades, prints and posters. Sustainability is at the heart of my practice and I make a point of sourcing recycled materials wherever possible.
When I’m not illustrating, I like hiking, yoga and a strong cup of coffee. I’m currently living in Leeds where I share a studio with another illustrator and a number of large, leafy houseplants.
See my portfolio, and follow my updates on Instagram @KatWilliams_Illustration.


Nanny K

Profile: Nanny K

I’m dyslexic & I write children’s life skill rhymes and songs that allow them to thrive with communication while they play. Covering all areas of development to help during their day. We use a different part of our brains to store songs than we do when we talk and read. The more we say the more they will hear. It is far easier to repeat ourselves if we sing it rather than say it. I believe is the way to improve speech and language development. I believe in if we see, we sing, we say more everyday.
Say Hello: nannyk@seesingsay.co.uk


Mel Woodend

Profile: Mel Woodend

Mel Wardle Woodend is Staffordshire Poet Laureate 2019-2022.
Mel holds an MA Creative Writing, is one half of WORD Stafford, enjoys facilitating poetry workshops, and participating in spoken word.
She is founder of dyslexia friendly publishing company Dream Well Writing Ltd, reflecting her passion for making reading and books accessible to all.

Find Out More: https://www.melwoodendwriting.com/


Andy N

Profile: Andy N

Andy N is the author of 6 full length poetry collections, the most recent being 'Haiku of life' and co-runs Chorlton's always welcoming Spoken Word Open Mic 'Speak Easy'.
He does ambient music under the name of Ocean in a Bottle and has a regular column on the Sunday Tribune.
He runs/co-runs Podcast series such as Spoken Label, Reading in Bed, Comics Unity, Koll, Andy and Amanda and Wrestle Up.

Find Out More: Website   Facebook


Mark P

Profile: Mark P

Mark Pajak has written for The BBC and The Guardian, among others.
He has been three times commended in the National Poetry Competition, awarded first place in The Bridport Prize and has also received a Northern Writers’ Award and an Eric Gregory Award. His first collection is forthcoming in 2022.
Find Out More: Website


Gareth

Profile: Gareth

I approach poetry as a beginner and enjoy the thrill and fun of playing with words to create poems which really speak to people.
The poetry I write covers all aspects of life, through my eyes; a (nearly) 40 year old man, with two boys and a wife, growing up in and owning a business in Crewe, Cheshire until we moved to Conwy in 2020.
Find out more...

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